flying geese quilt blocks for the Pixie medallion quilt pattern by Sharon McConnell, colorgirlquilts.com
Pixie Medallion Quilt Along, Quilting Interest, Work in progress

Pixie Medallion Quilt Along…it’s growing!

It’s hard to believe how far we have come on our Pixie Medallion quilt along. This month we sewed the first two flying geese borders. It is A LOT of flying geese, whew! We divided this border into two months because it really is a lot of sewing…and it’s a good thing because I barely squeaked by getting my pink and orange ones done in February.

If you are just joining the quilt along or want to know more about making your own Pixie Medallion quilt, click here for the quilt along home page and links to past posts.flying geese quilt blocks for the Pixie medallion quilt pattern by Sharon McConnell, colorgirlquilts.com

For this section, I am following the pattern and making my geese in rainbow order starting with pink. I added the purple ones to alternate on my pink row, just for a bit of interest. All of the orange ones are the same textured print that’s almost solid. I debated making the orange ones from different fabrics, but I couldn’t find other orange fabrics in shades I liked in my stash of Art Gallery Fabrics. I had a good size piece of this fabric on hand and I really like the coral-ish, not-too-bright orange color. I have made this entire quilt from my stash! That feels really good.flying geese quilt blocks for the Pixie medallion quilt pattern by Sharon McConnell, colorgirlquilts.com

One of the scariest parts making a medallion quilt is the moment you go to sew the next border on. The size of your quilt (as well as the borders) have to be really accurate so that the borders will fit. The borders that are pieced in blocks like flying geese don’t give you much room for error. You’ll notice in your pattern that you are instructed to cut your stop borders (narrow strips between each border) a bit wider than needed and then trim them down. This is a technique I always use for making sure my strips end up exactly the right width and as straight as possible.

When you cut and sew narrow strips, it’s really easy for them to get distorted and “wavy”. If you start with them a bit wider than needed, you have room to trim your quilt to exactly the right measurement to fit your next border and to trim off any distortion for really straight strips. (it’s a little nerve-wracking to do this step, though! nobody wants to cut it wrong (-: )flying geese quilt blocks for the Pixie medallion quilt pattern by Sharon McConnell, colorgirlquilts.com

Success! all trimmed up and pressed, my Pixie is getting so big it’s difficult to photograph. We haven’t had the greatest weather for outdoor photos so I’ll give you this bit of a peek today and the grand reveal of the finish next month (-:

I’ve seen a few Pixies popping up, and I love the variety! isn’t it fun to see how different a quilt looks in your own unique colors and fabrics? Be sure and tag me if you post on instagram (@colorgirlquilts) or Facebook. Also use #greatpixieqal and #pixiemedallion.

If you are inspired to make your own, you’ll find the pattern Here.

Be Colorful and Happy Sewing!

Sharon McConnell, Color Girl quilts

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3 thoughts on “Pixie Medallion Quilt Along…it’s growing!

  1. Cheryl says:

    I’m not a big fan of medallion quilts, but yours is changing my mind. It’s beautiful.

  2. cswitz728 says:

    The quilt is Beautiful.. Love it

  3. Paula says:

    Your quilt is coming together beautifully. I’ve always said I’d never have the patience to make one myself, but I said the same about EPP before I started it, and now when I see such a gorgeous medallion quilt I find myself thinking about attempting one.

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