Mitered Corners, Tutorials

*Easy* Mitered Corner

mitered corners are fun…and attractive!

I really like the look of mitered corners. I have used this method for all sorts of borders as well as piecing within a quilt (think diamonds).

Sewing time has been short the last couple of weekends, but I did work on my Noteworthy quilt today, adding three of the borders.
I want to show how I do the mitered corners….a really easy way!

1. To determine the length of your first set of border strips: see my border tutorials here and here (but don’t cut them yet!), then multiply the width of your borders by two and add that to the length you have determined is needed for the strips. (for example, my border strips are 4 1/2″ wide, and I measured my quilt at 57″. So I added 9-10″ to that, so my border strips are 67″ long x 4 1/2″ wide)

2. determine the length of the second set of border strips. For mitered corners, the length of all four borders is determined BEFORE sewing any of them onto the quilt.

3. cut all four borders to the correct length as determined above. Use the border tutorial for reference in correctly sewing the borders to the quilt (marking the center, ends, etc), except that the extra length of the border strips will hang over the ends of the quilt.

When you sew the borders to the center of quilt, stitch only to within 1/4 inch of the corner of the quilt. The back should look like the photo below (the blue fabric is the border, notice how two adjacent blue borders are sewn to the white fabric, but the seam stops at 1/4″ from the corner):

back view, no seam at the corners of the white

This is the front view:

4. open up the border strips away from the quilt, but do not press.

5. fold the quilt in half so the the left edge border is brought down to cover the bottom border.  Right sides of fabric are facing, forming a 45 degree angle with the corner of the quilt as shown below:


**I am left-handed. if this looks backward, reverse your fold and cut angles**

6. be very careful to match the border seams on top of each other. I use my finger to feel the groove of the seam and make sure the bottom one is straight under the top one,

the center of the quilt should form a 45 degree angle to the borders. You should see the unsewn corner of the quilt center folded back like the white in the photo above.

6. place your ruler with the straight edge parallel to the folded edge of the quilt,

line up the 45 degree angle on the ruler with the bottom edge of the border strip,

and the 1/4″ mark along the fold of the quilt:

Notice how the corner of the white fabric is still folded back, away from the blue in the photo above.

7. cut the border strip at the 45 degree angle, and 1/4″ longer than the folded quilt:

8. pin if desired to hold the angled cuts together for sewing.
when you place the unit under your presser foot, the needle should go down at the point where the seam ripper is pointing in the photo below:

this will start your seam right at that notch formed by the unsewn corner of the white fabric.
sew a quarter inch seam out to the corner of the border.

quarter inch seam from quilt to corner of borders

9. open the seam and press from the BACK of the quilt, toward the borders, with the mitered seam open:

back view: pressing

You have a beautifully mitered corner!

I will get this one done! it seems like I have been working on it forever. I like the colors, though.
Hope you had a fun weekend (lots of sun here!) and a great week ahead,

Sharon

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5 thoughts on “*Easy* Mitered Corner

  1. Gill says:

    Thanks Sharon – I love the look of mitred corners but I’ve never found an easy way of doing them! I shall try your method!

  2. P. says:

    This makes so much sense, thanks for the visual and clear directions. I did mitered corners in an attic windows quilt and felt like I was flying blind to make them just right so they would lie flat.

  3. I need to try this sometime. Thanks for the tutorial 🙂

  4. Lucy ~ charm about you says:

    Brilliant!! Thank you for the clear instructions!

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